Visit cedarkeynews.com to stay abreast of all the latest happenings in Cedar Key - especially now that the city is preparing to host Smithsonion next month!

 

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 What would life be like without teachers, doctors or firefighters? Every day Americans are hard at work on farms, factories, in homes, or at desks keeping our communities thriving. The Cedar Key Historical Society, in cooperation with the Florida Humanities Council, will explore the professions and the people that sustain American society when it hosts “The Way We Worked,” a Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition. “The Way We Worked” will be on view from Saturday, September 13, 2014, through Sunday, October 24, 2014.
 
Cedar Key and the surrounding community have been expressly chosen by the Florida Humanities Council to host “The Way We Worked” as part of the Museum on Main Street project—a national/state/local partnership to bring exhibitions and programs to rural cultural organizations. The exhibition will tour six communities in Florida from September 13 through July 4, 2015.
“The Way We Worked,” adapted from an original exhibition developed by the National Archives and Records Administration, explores how work has become a central element in American culture. It traces the many changes that have affected the workforce and work environments over the past 150 years, including the growth of manufacturing and increasing use of technology. The exhibition draws from the Archives’ rich collections, including historical photographs, archival accounts of workers, film, audio and interactives, to tell the compelling story of how work impacts our individual lives and the historical and cultural fabric of our communities.
 
“We are very pleased to be able to bring ‘The Way We Worked’ to our area,” said Cedar Key Historical Society President Ken Young. “It allows us the opportunity to explore this fascinating aspect of our own region’s history, and we hope that it will inspire many to become even more involved in the cultural life of our community.”
 
“Allowing all of our state’s residents to have access to the cultural resources of our nation’s premiere museum is a priority of the Florida Humanities Council,” said Janine Farver, Executive Director. “With this special tour, we are pleased to be working with Cedar Key to help develop local exhibitions and public programs to compliment the Smithsonian exhibition.” Such free events and experiences include:  wildlife refuge highlights, clam farming, aquaculture and art gallery exhibitions, A Taste of Cedar Key involving local restaurants’ presentations, and much more. The last week of the Smithsonian’s visit will culminate in the area’s famous and long-standing Cedar Key Annual Seafood Festival on October 18 and 19, 2014.  The Way We Worked will close on October 24, 2014.
 
“The Way We Worked” is part of Museum on Main Street, a unique collaboration between the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES), state humanities councils across the nation and local host institutions. To learn more about “The Way We Worked” and other Museum on Main Street exhibitions, visitwww.museumonmainstreet.org.
 
Support for Museum on Main Street has been provided by the United States Congress.
 
SITES connects millions of Americans with their shared cultural heritage through a wide
 
range of art, science and history exhibitions. State humanities councils, located in each state and U.S. territory, support community-based humanities programs that highlight such topics as local history, literature and cultural traditions. The Cedar Key Historical Society serves the local community by encouraging and fostering interest in the area’s history and acting as a steward of the surrounding area, preserving its unique heritage.  To learn more, visit  http://www.cedarkeyhistoricalmuseum.org/  and thehttp://www.flahum.org/ sites.
 
CONTACTS
The Cedar Key Historical Ssociety, Museum on Main Street, 609 Second Street, Cedar Key, Florida  32625.    cedarcedar@bellsouth.net, 352-543-5549.
 
The Floria Humanities Council, Museum on Main Street, 599 Second Street South,
 
St. Petersburg, FL 33701,    Alex Buell, abuell@flahum.orgm, 727-873-2001
 
Smithsonian Contact Jennifer Schommer, 202.633.3121; schommerj@si.edu

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Smithsonian MoMS Exhibit Now Set-up
From article in: www.cedarkeynews.com
 
EXHIBIT IN PLACE

September 5, 2014

SEPT 5 MOMS WHOLE GPColleagues from Palm Harbor, Casselberry, New Smyrna Beach, Belle Glade, and Marco Island converged at the Cedar Key Library’s upstairs meeting room to participate in the workshop designed to teach participants to ably interpret, assemble, and disassemble the Smithsonian’s “The Way We Worked” traveling exhibit, which will remain in place until October 24, 2014.  The group is pictured to the left.

The exhibit will travel to these other five small Florida cities when it leaves Cedar Key in October and these visitors will be the exhibit’s orchestrators in their towns. They came ready to learn and learn they did.   

Welcoming them with smiles and coffee were Cedar Key Vice-Mayor Sue Colson, Cedar Key Historical Society President Ken Young, Cedar Key Historical Society Museum Director Galina Binkley, cedar Key's own Dr. John Andrews, and Levy County Visitors Bureau Exeutive Director Carol McQueen.  Later in the day, participants experienced a first-hand taste of “how Cedar Key works” with lunch at Tony’s Seafood Restaurant, a location so integral to the city’s living history of fishing and tourism.  Andrews, Colson, and McQueen are pictured to the right.

What was an empty room at 8am became, before nSEPT 5 MOMS SUE AND MCQDSCN4265oon, a series of colorful gears, action-filled pictures, informative banners, and interactives explaining how Americans have labored over the past 150 years.                                           

Smithsonian Institution Director of Exhibits Carol Harsh led the workshop, carefully overviewing the contents of some twelve huge crates and their packing logic and demonstrating, in much detail, the erection of one of the exhibit’s parts.  Instruction included everything from how to introduce visitors to the exhibit’s meaningful content to the repacking of the crates and the truck at the exhibit’s end.  Harsh is pictured in the above left snapshot in the polka-dotted center.

SEPT 5 MOMS REPS DSCN4246

Florida Humanities Council Program Coordinator Alex Buell and his colleagues Dr. Jennifer Snyder and Keith Simmons functioned as the critical support team assisting the small Florida cities’ representatives construct their assigned part of the exhibit.   University of Florida Master Lecturer, the Department of History, Dr. Steven Noll will function as Cedar Key’s resident expert on the exhibit’s content.

Demonstrating the adage that learning is doing, the participants did, indeed, learn as they worked.  Under Harsh’s careful eyes and with Buell’s, Snyder’s, and Simmons’ assistance, the exhibit took shape.  No hammers, no nails, no pliers, no wrenches were needed, so well designed is the exhibit. 

The session ended with no ceiling tiles, no ceiling fans, and no lights lost in the endeavor and learned, confident, smiling small cities’ representatives.    

*******

Article from Gainesville Sun dated September 11, 2014 Traveling Smithsonian exhibit in Cedar Key

V“THE WAY WE WORKED”
 OPENS WITH FEAST
September 15, 2014

DSCN4381-xpFeasting on mouth-watering baked clams, Tony’s rich, delicious clam chowder, and huge butter-drenched steamed clams, wll over ninety of the Cedar Key community and its visitors gathered behind the Library and the Chamber of Commerce last evening to celebrate the opening of the Smithsonian presence to Cedar Key.

                                                                DSCN4392-xpc

Visitors also toured the ongoing exhibits, which will remain in place for the six-week visit, along Second Street:  the Cedar Key Arts Center second floor gallery, the Aquaculture Association exhibit with the giant clam outside its door welcoming them inside, the Cedar Key Historical Society Museum, and the Smithsonian’s The Way We Worked” exhibit in the Library’s second floor meeting room.

 

Levy County Visitors Bureau Executive Director Carol McQueen dressed in last century garb.  Maurice Hendrix, Lannie Cardona, and Dale Register manned the bar.   Sue Colson and Leslie Sturmer served while Russ Colson and Ada Lang cooked clams.    Vincent Quinn served Tony’s chowder.  Linda Seyfert provided not only the truly Cedar Key décor but the recipe for the baked clams.

DSCN4394-xpc

The Whitney Laboraatory for Marine Science and Seahorse Key Marine Laboratory group were, indeed,  present. Director of Developent and External Relations Jessica Long is picturred here in yellow.  Seahorse Key Marine Lab Associate Director and Research Assistant Professor  with the Departmennt of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation at the University of Florida Dr. Coleman Sheehy III is the gentleman with his arm about Ms. Long.  The second lady with Dr. Sheehy is Cedar Key's own Dr. Maria Sgmbati, Education and Outreach Coordinator with the University of Florida  and based at the Kirkpatrick Marine Lab on Cedar Key.

 Lilly Rooks, currently running for Levy County Commissioner in District Four, graced the exhibits.

                                                              DSCN4396-xpc                                                                               

The Drummond Bank, Cedar Key Aquaculture Association, the Lions, Tony’s Seafood, the Chamber of Commerce, and other businesses and individuals came together in true Cedar Key style to produce the Sunday evening event.

<< Central Florida Community College and 5th Grade students from Chiefland Elementary School visited our museum and other sites while the Smithsonian exhibit was in Cedar Key >>

details written by Mandy Offerle Photo and article originally appeared in Cedar Key News Online
On Wednesday, October 22, 2014, Cedar Key Historical Museum Society President Ken Young and the Cedar Key Chamber of Commerce’s Leslie Valen thanked eleven Cedar Key School students for taking active parts in the city’s The Way We Worked celebration.  These eleven students, in period dress, acted as docents on the Walking Tours of Sunday, September 21 and Sunday, October 12.
 
Young trained the students and provided a script, particularly designed for the location to which each was assigned, for each.   The students, including two energetic non-high school students, and their locations follow. 
 
 
Elementary School Student:
Emma Valen, Hale-Johnson House
 
Middle School Student:
Trey Stanfield, Cedar Key School
 
High School Students:
Abigail Osteen, City Hall
Dakota Phillips, L & M
Ciera Beckham, Hodges House
Alora Beckham, Tony’s Seafood Restaurant
Alicia Neal, Library
Heather Sikes, L & M
Emily Colson, Island Hotel
Emilie Lavoie, Hodges House
Delaney Miller, Tony’s Seafood Restaurant
 
In addition to the thanks from Young and Valen, students received a certificate of appreciation documenting their efforts.   Presentation of the certificates occurred in the lunchroom filled with high school students who clapped and hoorayed for their fellows.   Students also earned partial hours for community service, which is required by the State of Florida for high school graduation.

This bus brought a tour group out to Cedar Key on the very first day of the Smithsonian's traveling exhibit: "The Way We Worked". Fifty Two senior citizens from the Gainesville area enjoyed viewing the four venues of Musem on Main Street.

The combined energies of Ken Young the current President of Cedar Key Historical Society Museum along with Dr. John Andrews, one of our past presidents, who also frequently works with others as a docent, provide guests with much valuable insight.

Visitors to the four locations of the Museum on Main Street in Cedar Key enjoyed their stops at the Library where the Smithsonian exhibits are located, then a walk across the street to the Cedar Key Arts Center, next a stop at the Cedar Key Aquaculture Association's live exhibit which shows the story of clam and oyster farming; then most visitors came to the CKHS museum to learn even more about the history of how people earned their livelihood in Cedar Key in the past and how they work today.

Smithsonian Museum on Main Street:
“THE WAY WE WORKED”

EXHIBIT IN PLACE

From article in www.cedarkeynews.com

September 5, 2014

SEPT 5 MOMS WHOLE GPColleagues from Palm Harbor, Casselberry, New Smyrna Beach, Belle Glade, and Marco Island converged at the Cedar Key Library’s upstairs meeting room to participate in the workshop designed to teach participants to ably interpret, assemble, and disassemble the Smithsonian’s “The Way We Worked” traveling exhibit, which will remain in place until October 24, 2014.  The group is pictured to the left.

The exhibit will travel to these other five small Florida cities when it leaves Cedar Key in October and these visitors will be the exhibit’s orchestrators in their towns. They came ready to learn and learn they did.   

Welcoming them with smiles and coffee were Cedar Key Vice-Mayor Sue Colson, Cedar Key Historical Society President Ken Young, Cedar Key Historical Society Museum Director Galina Binkley, cedar Key's own Dr. John Andrews, and Levy County Visitors Bureau Exeutive Director Carol McQueen.  Later in the day, participants experienced a first-hand taste of “how Cedar Key works” with lunch at Tony’s Seafood Restaurant, a location so integral to the city’s living history of fishing and tourism.  Andrews, Colson, and McQueen are pictured to the right.

What was an empty room at 8am became, before noon, a series of colorful gears, action-filled pictures, informative banners, and interactives explaining how Americans have labored over the past 150 years.                                           SEPT 5 MOMS SUE AND MCQDSCN4265

Smithsonian Institution Director of Exhibits Carol Harsh led the workshop, carefully overviewing the contents of some twelve huge crates and their packing logic and demonstrating, in much detail, the erection of one of the exhibit’s parts.  Instruction included everything from how to introduce visitors to the exhibit’s meaningful content to the repacking of the crates and the truck at the exhibit’s end.  Harsh is pictured in the above left snapshot in the polka-dotted center.

SEPT 5 MOMS REPS DSCN4246

Florida Humanities Council Program Coordinator Alex Buell and his colleagues Dr. Jennifer Snyder and Keith Simmons functioned as the critical support team assisting the small Florida cities’ representatives construct their assigned part of the exhibit.   University of Florida Master Lecturer, the Department of History, Dr. Steven Noll will function as Cedar Key’s resident expert on the exhibit’s content.

Demonstrating the adage that learning is doing, the participants did, indeed, learn as they worked.  Under Harsh’s careful eyes and with Buell’s, Snyder’s, and Simmons’ assistance, the exhibit took shape.  No hammers, no nails, no pliers, no wrenches were needed, so well designed is the exhibit. 

The session ended with no ceiling tiles, no ceiling fans, and no lights lost in the endeavor and learned, confident, smiling small cities’ representatives.    

*******

www.cedarkeynews.com featured a story about the arrival of the Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibit: Museum on Main Street -The Way We Worked. L-R: Dr. John Andrews, Ken Young, Galina Binkley, George Sresovich, David Binkley. Ken is the President of Cedar Key Historical Society and Galina is the Executive Director. Cedar Key Historical Society is the local sponsor for this event with cooperation from several organizations and individuals in Cedar Key. This on-line newspaper gives addtional and complete information about this major happening for our small town. We hope to see some more folks visit Cedar Key in the coming weeks for this very interesting event.

<< Museum on Main Street - MoMS in Cedar Key! >>

The Cedar Key Historical Society is pleased to announce that it has been selected to host Museum on Main Street, which will be taking place from September through October of 2014. Funded in part by the United States Congress, MoMS combines the talents of the Smithsonian Institution, the state humanities councils, and local organizations to bring national and local heritage to small communities across the United States.

The physical exhibit, which is titled “The Way We Worked”, explores how work became a central element in American culture by tracing the many changes that affected the workforce and work environments over the past 150 years. The exhibit will be located on the second floor of the Cedar Key Public Library, and will be open to the public free of charge.

During this event, we plan to showcase the history of our community by offering a public program consisting of weekly tours and presentations led by our local citizenry. We will be kicking off the program with a reception at the CKHS Museum, co-hosted by the Cedar Key Aquaculture Association.

During the first week of the program, Pam Darty, park ranger with the SUFWS Lower Suwanee National Wildlife Refuge, will be conducting tours of Shell Mound, a large prehistoric Indian mound on the mainland, just off the Cedar Keys.

During the second week Toni Collins, local historian, author, and storyteller, will provide a unique historic perspective of our offshore keys. Dressed in period costume, she will also lead a tour of the Cedar Keys Light Station.

In the weeks to follow there will be local tours offered by the Cedar Key Historical Society, as well as 3 ongoing Art Exhibits sponsored by the Cedar Key Arts Center. Leslie Sturmer, UF shellfish aquaculture specialist will introduce our clam farming industry with talks and tours of our local facilities.

These are just a few of the exciting events we have planned for next fall. We are certain that this program, with its national exposure, will bring recognition to our rich history, but will also attract increased visitation on a significant scale.

 

Thanks Ken Young – President, Cedar Key Historical Society 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Google Calendar

Schedule of important events during Smithsonian's exhibit: "The Way We Worked".

 
BANNER RAISED, 
ANNOUNCING THE SMITHSONIAN
TRAVELING EXHIBIT IN CEDAR KEY

August 5, 2014

MoMS Banner 3811xeMoMS Banner 001e

Preparations are underway for the Smithsonian’s traveling exhibit, The Way We Worked,” coming to Cedar Key on Saturday, September 13 through Friday, October 24, 2014!  Pictured are Cedar Key Public Works staffers Brian Hancok and Norm Hodge applauded by Vice Mayor Sue Colson as they stretch the banner announcing the event at the corner of Second Street and State Road 24, yesterday, Monday, August 4, 2014.

The six-week event celebrates the many facets of Cedar Key’s workers from our Indian heritage through our fishing, railroad, fiber, lumber, clamming, oyster, retail, ecotourism, hiking, boating, kayaking, and restaurant industries.
 
Be certain to place the event on your calendar.

Smithsonian Institute comes to town!

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